Police check the damaged windshield of a bus involved in a collision with a pedestrialn Friday morning. The incident occurred in the roundabout on Homer Watson Boulevard, near St. Mary's High School.

Police check the damaged windshield of a bus involved in a collision with a pedestrialn Friday morning. The incident occurred in the roundabout on Homer Watson Boulevard, near St. Mary's High School.

KITCHENER — A 16-year-old girl was struck Friday morning by a bus at a roundabout in Kitchener, just steps from her school.

The girl was taken to hospital with injuries, including “a lot of scrapes and facial injuries,’’ said acting Sgt. Tim Boniface of Waterloo Regional Police. The injuries did not appear to be life-threatening.

The driver’s side windshield of a Grand River Transit bus was smashed.

Sharon Anthony-Jan’s 17-year-old daughter was driving at the roundabout and witnessed the collision. Her daughter, a Grade 12 student at St. Mary’s High School, helped the girl who was unconscious on the ground.

She accompanied the girl to the hospital. The girl had a broken leg, Anthony-Jan said.

Anthony-Jan said her daughter was a “mess and in tears” after witnessing the crash. She said a bridge or cat walk should be built at the roundabout to ensure students get to school safely.

“Sadly someone will be killed before attention is paid to this,’’ she said.

The incident occurred at 8:43 a.m. at the roundabout at Homer Watson Boulevard and Block Line Road in southwest Kitchener. It’s near St. Mary’s High School.

Police say the girl was standing on a median, attempting to get through the roundabout. The eastbound bus was turning right from Homer Watson Boulevard to Block Line Road.

The bus was empty at the time and heading to a plaza to pick up passengers.

It was driven by an experienced bus driver, who was shaken up by the collision, said Eric Gillespie, director of transit services for the Grand River Transit.

He said all bus drivers get training on how to drive through roundabouts.

The driver pressed a button in the bus which notifies 911 operators and provided a first-aid kit to passersby who assisted the girl before paramedics arrived.

The big roundabout — the first in the region with three lanes around part of it — is busy during morning rush hours, with fast-moving vehicles and high school students walking to school.

Eli Corbin, a 17-year-old Grade 12 student at St. Mary’s, said he was surprised the damage to the bus windshield was made by a collision with a pedestrian.

“I thought it was a rock,” he said.

Corbin said he didn’t like the roundabout in an area where the traffic moves so fast.

“Why would you build a big roundabout in front of a high school,” he said.

Regional transportation commissioner Thomas Schmidt said this is third time a pedestrian has been hit in a roundabout in Waterloo Region.

Other incidents both occurred at Can-Amera Parkway and Conestoga Boulevard in Cambridge: one in 2009 when a pedestrian walked into the centre of a roundabout; and another in 2010 when a car rear-ended another car, which then hit a pedestrian.

Schmidt said roundabouts are still safe for pedestrians. In the region, 119 people were hit on regional roads in 2010, 98 in 2009 and 119 in 2008.

“We are very concerned for this young woman and we will be looking at this roundabout to see what we need to do it to make it safer,’’ he said.

Schmidt said some changes have already been made at the roundabout including posting speed limit signs. He said regional staff is also conducting a speed study on Homer Watson Boulevard.

The current speed limit is 60 kilometres an hour.

The $1.7-million circle, open just over a month, has seen 20 reported collisions, although with no major injuries were reported.

Traffic planners argue it will keep traffic flowing and be safer for pedestrians and motorists, if everyone pays attention and follows the rules.

Regional police and Grand River Transit are investigating.

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