Constables Peter Jeon, left, and Arun Daniels get together to talk about the role of the community police officer in Rideau-Goulbourn and West Carleton. Daniels takes over from Jeon on Aug. 1.

Constables Peter Jeon, left, and Arun Daniels get together to talk about the role of the community police officer in Rideau-Goulbourn and West Carleton. Daniels takes over from Jeon on Aug. 1.

Const. Arun Daniels is the new community police officer in Rideau-Goulbourn.

As part of the tenure process within the Ottawa Police Service, community police officers are switched around every four years. Daniels takes over from Const. Peter Jeon, who returns to patrol work in downtown Ottawa, Aug. 1.

Originally from the U.K., Daniels, 37, was a patrol and criminal investigations officer for five years in Kent (south-east England) before moving to Ottawa to attend the police academy less than a decade ago. He has since done patrols in the city core, before moving on to work in Bells Corners with the school resources unit, and finally to Kanata.

He explained that the jump across the Atlantic came while visiting his wife’s relatives Canada. The open space and freedom from cramped English living conditions captured him. They now live in West Carleton, the other ward Daniels will also be responsible for on duty.

Every cop has their own style, often based on aspects of different mentors they have observed over the years. Some are more strident, others more affable, although all understand rules and guidelines are to be followed in handling individual situations. Daniels describes his as a balanced approach.

“There are many ways to skin a cat,” he said. “But I try and have a balanced between the enforcement side with education.”

Daniels’ goals as community police officer in Rideau-Goulbourn and West Carleton is to continue the partnership-building Jeon started.

“Peter’s done a good job at that,” he said. “It’s a bit of sustaining, and building on relationships with community groups, neighbourhood watch, and business groups.”

Daniels and Jeon said neighbour disputes crop up, usually because one neighbour lets an issue fester than calls bylaw before even attempting to talk it out. Others will court problems with their neighbours. Every situation is unique, and demands an individualized response from police.

Although Daniels hasn’t worked on any high profile murder cases, he’s seen enough fatal accidents and violent assaults. He said training carries him through at the scene, because the job demands certain expectations. But when he sets down the gun at the end of the day, and emotions run high, he knows where to turn.

“You need to have a good network of friends inside and outside the service,” he said, “and it’s important to have that family support.”

As for his name’s spelling - “Arun” instead of Aaron: he’s half Irish, and his mom wanted that reflected in her boy’s name. But his father accidently named him after River Arun in West Sussex.

And yes, it will come at no surprise to learn he is a football fan.

“I love soccer,” he said, adding that the Tottenham Hotspurs – a London squad – is his team. He’s played soccer and cricket, and best understands hockey as a sport played on a field.

“There’s not much ice there. So that’s a problem,” he said, laughing.

Jeon, for his part, said he will miss working in rural Ottawa, but is looking forward to stepping back from it and considering the work of a rural cop from the outside.

“I love rural, it’s near and dear to my heart but now I need to do some out of space travelling and change things up a bit,” he said. He said he plans to return to the rural area eventually. “Now is the time to step back and reflect and hopefully to spin back here someday.”