Fri, 16 Nov 2012 17:45:00 GMT | By Tenille Bonoguore
Top news: Week ending Nov. 17, 2012

A week of turmoil



It was a tumultuous week that started with Remembrance Day and ended with looming battles in the Middle East. (© Lee Celano/Files/Reuters; Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press; Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images;Sarah Conard/Reuters)
Next
Previous
Previous
  • It was a tumultuous week that started with Remembrance Day and ended with looming battles in the Middle East. (© Lee Celano/Files/Reuters; Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press; Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images;Sarah Conard/Reuters)
  • Week started with concerns that Israel and Syria were about the enter a dangerous showdown, but soon all eyes were on Gaza. (© Ariel Schalit/AP Photo)
  • What seemed to be an unfortunate moral slipup by a widely lauded U.S. General became the stuff of international intrigue this week as General David Petraeus resigned as the head of the CIA (© ISAF/AP Photo)
  • Fallout from an entirely different scandal continued to descend on Montreal’s leaders as the corruption allegations led to more resignations. (© Christinne Muschi/Reuters; Mike Sturk/Reuters)
  • In the midst of everything, Canada joined people around the world to pause for Remembrance Day. (© Ahmad Masood/Reuters)
  • BlackBerry maker Research In Motion finally set a date for its do-or-die launch of the new BB10 operating system
  • And it wouldn’t be late-Fall in Canada without a flurry of weird weather.
Next
Lee Celano/Files/Reuters; Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press; Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images;Sarah Conard/ReutersShow Thumbnails
Previous1 of 7Next
Share this Gallery

It was a tumultuous week that started with Remembrance Day and ended with looming battles in the Middle East.

But here at The Rundown, a few themes sprung up, with the first rooted in the communal hip pocket. Finance Minister Jim Flaherty kicked things off with a fiscal update full of bigger deficits, longer recoveries, and the likelihood that more than a few election promises might have to be dropped along the way.

Canadians have responded to all this uncertainty by… buying new cars. Household debt grew at its fastest pace in two years, with the average non-mortgage debt hitting $26,768. (Sadly, the party was ruined for Toyota when it had to recall of almost 15,000 Priuses in Canada.)

While we were drowning our sorrows with the new-car smell, Europeans were taking to the streets in a series of anti-austerity protests that turned violent this week.

BP agreed to pay $4.5 billion, and have three employees charged with manslaughter, following the Deepwater Horizon explosion and oil spill. Greenpeace said the fine “amounts to a rounding error” for the global giant.

In Ireland, that country’s abortion laws were thrown into a harsh spotlight after a pregnant woman died during a miscarriage at a Dublin hospital.

Politics took centre stage too. After the drama of last week’s U.S. election, the installation of Xi Jinpeng as China’s new leader was uncannily orderly.

The same can’t be said for the Liberal Party in Canada, which is facing two increasingly fractious leadership battles. Martha Hall Findlay officially threw her hat into the ring for the national leadership, pitting her ‘guts’ against frontrunner Justin Trudeau’s fabulous hair.

And the field in Ontario is just getting crowded, with Gerard Kennedy, Eric Hoskins and Charles Sousa joining Glen Murray, Kathleen Wynne and Sandra Pupatello in the race to replace Dalton McGuinty.

In Rome, the Pope proclaimed it was “beautiful to be old”, but someone forgot to tell two elderly female friends in Nova Scotia who were facing deportation because the American woman didn’t have residency, and her Canadian friend couldn’t cope without assistance with early-stage dementia. They found out a day later that they’ll be allowed back in.

Junk food lovers felt a bit of shock this week when Hostess, makers of Twinkies and Ding Dongs, shut its doors in the U.S. after a national strike by workers crippled operations, the company said. Hostess-loving Canadians don’t need to worry, though: The Montreal-based company Saputo Inc. holds the Canadian rights to the brand.

And in PEI, a southern visitor of another kind caused a stir as a wayward pelican got birders twittering with excitement.

But on to the biggest stories of the week.

Image Search for A week of turmoil on Bing
Image
Previous 1 of 1 Next
loading
See more results results by