cbc.ca (© Copyright: (C) Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, http://www.cbc.ca/aboutcbc/discover/termsofuse.html#Rss)
Updated: Wed, 02 Oct 2013 11:06:14 GMT | By CBC News, cbc.ca

Baby boomers mostly hold jobs long term, StatsCan says



This photo taken Aug. 6, 2013 shows Brad Karsh of JB Training Solutions speaking to a group of generation X'ers at the Hu-Friedy Manufacturing Co. in Chicago. There�s a new urgency to the quest for workplace harmony, as baby boomers delay retirement and work side-by-side with people young enough to be their children _ or grandchildren. Put people of widely different ages together, and there are bound to be differences. Baby boomers, for example, are workaholics, while Gen Xers demand more work-life balance. Millennials are masters of technology and have high, high expectations. M. Spencer Green/AP Photo

This photo taken Aug. 6, 2013 shows Brad Karsh of JB Training Solutions speaking to a group of generation X'ers at the Hu-Friedy Manufacturing Co. in Chicago. There�s a new urgency to the quest for workplace harmony, as baby boomers delay retirement and work side-by-side with people young enough to be their children _ or grandchildren. Put people of widely different ages together, and there are bound to be differences. Baby boomers, for example, are workaholics, while Gen Xers demand more work-life balance. Millennials are masters of technology and have high, high expectations. M. Spencer Green/AP Photo

Older baby boomers in Canada were mostly long-term job-holders throughout their working lives, usually working for three to six private-sector employers and experiencing few layoffs, a Statistics Canada study indicates.

- Canada's changing age and gender democraphics

- Baby boomers' health demands will pose challenges

Now in their mid-60s, these leading-edge boomers are the subject of a new report using data gathered over 28 years.

50s

While the upper-end two-thirds of workers were in the highly stable group, about a quarter were in what the study calls "mobile workers."

"Nonetheless," the report says, "mobile workers at the upper end of the earnings distribution appear to have fared reasonably well in terms of annual and cumulative earnings."

In the end, the "longitudinal" study — meaning it involved observations over a long period of time — concludes that there hasn't been much change among baby boomers in their tendency to keep their long-term employment habits. 

more video