cbc.ca (© Copyright: (C) Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, http://www.cbc.ca/aboutcbc/discover/termsofuse.html#Rss)
Updated: Sun, 02 Feb 2014 09:50:37 GMT | By CBC News, cbc.ca

L'Isle-Verte fire victims search shifts to DNA testing



An emergency worker walks past a sign that reads "Look out for our residents" as the search for victims of a seniors residence fire continues Friday, January 24, 2014 in L'Isle-Verte, Que. The seniors forced out of their residence by a devastating fire in L'Isle-Verte are in dire need of such items as clothes, hearing aids, and wheelchairs, the Red Cross says.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press

An emergency worker walks past a sign that reads "Look out for our residents" as the search for victims of a seniors residence fire continues Friday, January 24, 2014 in L'Isle-Verte, Que. The seniors forced out of their residence by a devastating fire in L'Isle-Verte are in dire need of such items as clothes, hearing aids, and wheelchairs, the Red Cross says.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press

The search is over at the site of a fire in L’Isle-Verte, Que., that destroyed a seniors' home, killing at least 27 people.

Five more people are still considered missing.

Bone fragments uncovered in the rubble of the Résidence du Havre seniors’ home on Jan. 23 have been sent to the coroner’s office in hopes that its expertise in forensic testing will provide answers to the families still awaiting news about the fate of their loved ones.

The coroner’s office will use DNA testing to try to identify the other remaining victims.

Police are still investigating the cause of the fire, and officers are now mandated to search for clues that could be admissible if the case goes to court.

A warrant was issued for the collection of clues late on Friday afternoon.

Investigators are considering multiple scenarios, including one in which the fire may have been the result of a criminal act.

more video