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Updated: Wed, 12 Feb 2014 01:55:48 GMT | By The Associated Press, cbc.ca

Mammoth tusk from ice age unearthed by construction workers



Science educator Meredith Hall places a Mardis Gras mask on the wooly mammoth skeleton Thursday morning Jan. 24, 2013, at the Owensboro Museum of Science and History in Owensboro, Ky. The staff have been preparing for the museum's Southern Mardi Gras theme fundraiser event, Stones & Bones. "This is our biggest annual fundraiser," Hall said. (© AP Photo/The Messenger-Inquirer, John Dunham)

Science educator Meredith Hall places a Mardis Gras mask on the wooly mammoth skeleton Thursday morning Jan. 24, 2013, at the Owensboro Museum of Science and History in Owensboro, Ky. The staff have been preparing for the museum's Southern Mardi Gras theme fundraiser event, Stones & Bones. "This is our biggest annual fundraiser," Hall said. (AP Photo/The Messenger-Inquirer, John Dunham) John Dunham/The Messenger-Inquirer/The Associated Press

Construction workers have found a tusk from an ice age mammoth, says a U.S. museum official.

The workers stopped digging when they found the fossil and called Seattle's Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, reported KIRO-TV.

Museum experts have examined the fossil and "we are confident that it represents a tusk from an ice age mammoth," said the museum's Christian Sidor on Tuesday. 

Since the fossil was found recently on private property, Sidor says it's up to the landowner to decide what to do with the tusk.

Sidor calls it "a rare opportunity to directly study Seattle's ancient natural history."

The ancient elephant relatives lived in Washington state until approximately 10,000 years ago, according to the museum.

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