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Updated: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 22:05:52 GMT | By CBC News, cbc.ca

'Toronto 18' member Ali Mohamed Dirie was under strict court order



A courtroom sketch shows Ali Mohamed Dirie appearing at a 2010 parole board hearing in Montreal. Dirie, sentenced to seven years in prison for his role in a plot designed to wreak havoc on Canadian targets, has reportedly died in Syria. Alex Tavshunsky/CBC

A courtroom sketch shows Ali Mohamed Dirie appearing at a 2010 parole board hearing in Montreal. Dirie, sentenced to seven years in prison for his role in a plot designed to wreak havoc on Canadian targets, has reportedly died in Syria. Alex Tavshunsky/CBC

Dirie

The order barred Dirie from having a passport and ordered him to report every two weeks to police, but as CBC News reported earlier this week that did not stop him from leaving the country. Dirie is said to have died fighting in Syria.

Dirie was convicted of smuggling weapons for the 'Toronto 18', which had planned a violent assault that included blowing up the CBC, CSIS and Parliament buildings, executing the prime minister and taking MPs hostage. But the Islamic extremist cell was thwarted after a series of raids in June and August of 2006.

He pleaded guilty in 2009 and was given credit of five years in pre-trial custody. Dirie ultimately served two years at Canada's highest maximum-security prison, the Special Handling Unit, in Quebec. He was released in October 2011.

The courts then imposed on him the rare 810 order, an unusual step only taken for high-risk offenders. Issued on Sept. 21, 2011, the order came with 15 conditions, and was signed by Dirie.

The order demanded he "abstain from applying for a new passport or have one 

Dirie complied with the order for about a year.

Jabatal-Nusra

- 'Toronto 18' member Ali Mohamed  reportedly died in Syria

Toronto police issued two warrants for Dirie, but it was too late.

He left Canada on a false passport, believed to be that of a relative described to CBC as looking nothing like Dirie.

"I can assure you there are a lot of people working very hard to track the activities of these individuals," said Justice Minister Peter MacKay.

"Here in Canada, we have improved our system of applications for passports, and Passport Canada is tasked with ensuring that false documents are not used to travel,” he said.

Passport Canada did not respond to a request for comment.

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